The Man with Stray Pets

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CYCLING STORIES

Do they have names?
The wife had asked a valid question. When you care for some animals and treat them different from the rest of the animal kingdom, it is inferred that they have developed their own identities with you.

That’s when he said it: “This one is Sheru, that one’s Laali.” I looked at them again. Their names have nothing to do with their appearances. Sheru is more like a lamb than a lion. Always in a slumber until he hears the familiar rumble of biscuit wrappers.

Sheru in a slumber
Sheru in a slumber

Laali is quite white – milky white colour unusual for a street dog – though her name indicates a red shade. And she is active and smarter than Sheru.

Laali: The name itself is a misnomer. She’s white and spotless.
Laali: The name itself is a misnomer. She’s white and spotless.

We met Surinder who runs this roadside stall a few weeks back and are his loyal customers since then. Our visits have sparked conversations with people from different walks of life, which I shall blog in the coming days.

The man himself
The man himself

Our little family uses our weekly cycling trip as a window of opportunity to reach out to wonderful strangers out there. I personally feel that such visits should support the local community and should be looked upon as a bridge- building effort between the two Indias.

Do you have stories of wonderful strangers in your location? Have you experienced the bliss of having a ‘stray’ pet? Share your stories.

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5 thoughts on “The Man with Stray Pets

    Mary Ann Barton said:
    May 21, 2015 at 19:15

    I’m intrigued by this story, Manu. How would you translate the words Sheru and Laali?

    Liked by 1 person

      manuchettan responded:
      May 22, 2015 at 11:03

      I’m so happy to see our comment, Mary. I shall try to translate the names. In Hindi language, the word “Sher” refers to lion. So Sheru is an affectionate way of mentioning a pet (it is like naming a pet dog “Tiger”). The word “Laal” in Hindi indicates the red color – revered by religious reasons, like the color of the holy vermilion that married women wear on their foreheads. So Laali is an affectionate way of calling someone (to indicate ‘that red one’). Hope this helps.

      Liked by 1 person

        Mary Ann Barton said:
        May 22, 2015 at 12:05

        Thanks, Manu, that’s helpful. I like thinking up names for cats, even though I only have one cat. Her name is Ginsberg, Ginzy for short. She was named by a previous owner after the poet Allen Ginsberg.

        Liked by 1 person

        manuchettan responded:
        May 22, 2015 at 16:45

        Hi Mary! I’m happy to meet another cat-lover. Ginzy is a beautiful name.

        Liked by 1 person

    New Break Point « Travels said:
    September 23, 2015 at 11:09

    […] was a beautiful morning. We were on the way cycling through our regular route, and fond that Surinder has shut shop. People laying pipelines in the neighbourhood said he has left for his native village […]

    Like

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